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The University of Iowa cluster systems each have home accounts with a 1-TB quota. The home accounts on the HPC cluster systems are distinct and not shared between the systems. The home accounts are available as a storage file share which is accessible both a) from every cluster node as your home directory, and b) from other computers on campus as an SMB/CIFS share, using your HawkID and password. These home accounts have automatic snapshots taken periodically, saving the state of the account at that point in time. Note that snapshots are not backups as they will expire. To access the snapshots, refer to the following documentation:

Accessing Snapshots on HPC Home Storage

You can connect your HPC home share to another system on the campus network in the following ways. replacing "myHawkID" with your own HawkID username. Note that your username (your HawkID) and the name of your home share happen to be the same, but they're separate entities. In these instructions, replace "myHawkID" with your actual HawkID.

Mount your HPC home share on your Linux system:

You must have root or sudo access on your system, and it must have the cifs-utils system package is installed. Run the following commands at a command line shell on your system, depending on which HPC home you wish to access. Each command should print nothing if successful, and should print an error if something is wrong.

The first time you use sudo to issue a command in your terminal shell , sudo will prompt you for the password of your local system user account, not your HawkID password. The sudo command typically remembers your permission a little while instead of prompting you every time, but eventually it will prompt you again.


1) On your system, create a directory where you will mount your home share:

Neon:


sudo mkdir -p /mnt/neon/myHawkID

Argon:

sudo mkdir -p /mnt/argon/myHawkID


2) On your system, mount your HPC home share into that directory:

Neon:

sudo mount -t cifs //neon-home.hpc.uiowa.edu/myHawkID \
-o user=myHawkID,domain=iowa,uid=$(id -u $(whoami)),gid=$(id -g $(whoami)),sec=ntlm,vers=1.0 \
/mnt/neon/myHawkID

Argon:

sudo mount -t cifs //argon-home.hpc.uiowa.edu/myHawkID \
-o user=myHawkID,domain=iowa,uid=$(id -u $(whoami)),gid=$(id -g $(whoami)),sec=ntlm,vers=1.0 \
/mnt/argon/myHawkID

Regardless of sudo, the mount command will always prompt you to enter the password of the user you specified with the "user=" and "domain=" options (i.e. your HawkID), not your local account's password. Check your prompt carefully!

At this point your home share should be mounted in the directory you created, so you can access it as a normal directory.


3) When you're done, make sure to run the following command to disconnect:

Neon:

sudo umount /mnt/neon/myHawkID

Argon:

sudo umount /mnt/argon/myHawkID

Mount your HPC home on your MacOS X-based system:

Bring up the "Connect to Server" dialog, either by selecting "Connect to Server..." from the "Go" menu in the Finder or by pressing CMD + K.

Then, enter this as the Server Address:

Neon:
smb://neon-home.hpc.uiowa.edu/myHawkID

Argon:
smb://argon-home.hpc.uiowa.edu/myHawkID

Then click the "Connect" button. Remember to use your HawkID password. Note that by using "smb://" you are using the latest version of the client supported by your version of MacOS X, but you can request the older version by substituting "cifs://" here instead of "smb://".

Mount your HPC home on your a Windows-based system:

Use the Explorer address bar to enter the share name. Remember to use the Windows format when specifying the server and the share (notice the slash characters):

Neon:
\\neon-home.hpc.uiowa.edu\myHawkID

Argon:
\\argon-home.hpc.uiowa.edu\myHawkID

Remember to specify the IOWA domain in front of your HawkID like this:
IOWA\myHawkID

What to do if your storage quota is reached

If you receive a message stating that your home account has reached its quota, and you cannot fill it any farther, you must remove some large files from your home directory. Sometimes, the rm command will fail with a message of "Quota has been reached." If this happens, here is what you can do to correct the issue.

  1. Pick a large, unwanted file to remove. 
  2. Copy the contents of /dev/null to this file. This will basically make the file a pointer to NULL values with a size of 0.

    cp /dev/null name_of_file_to_delete
  3. Once you have done this, you can use 'rm' as you normally would to free up more space.


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